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Post links to the results of your search


You found some resources, but we know you've got questions

Exercise

Share what you've found so far - use the discussion tab for this task. Post links to the resources you found.

Concluding discussion

Were you able to find what you needed?  Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable? How about any that were hard to use? Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 

How might you use the stuff that you found? Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

Now that you've found some materials to teach your topic, you can adapt and share them in Part Two of this course

Survey

Contribute to an international research project and help us understand more about the use of open resources! Take this closing survey to give feedback on your learning experience and help us improve the course: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/School_Of_Open_ALL

Task Discussion


  • Sharon Kaziunas said:

    User Experience Design Open Content Search

     
    Wikipedia:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_experience_design
     
    Interaction Design Diagram explaining IXD and UXD:
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d5/Interaction-Design-Disciplines.png
     
    MIT User Interface Design and Implementation Course (OER)
    https://www.oercommons.org/courses/6-831-user-interface-design-and-implementation-fall-2004
     

    Were you able to find what you needed?  

    Yes, for the most part.  Wikipedia is an awesome resource.

    Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?

    There were, from a simple google search it seemed like there a lot of open content on UX Design was found on blogs.  I would have to spend more time verifying their veracity than if it was from a trusted or known source or organization.  

    How about any that were hard to use?

    Did not experience anything that was hard to use.  

    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 

    I had trouble finding the liscence information for one article from Smashing Magazine that I wanted to use orginally, so I assumed it was not open.

    How might you use the stuff that you found? Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

    I think I would create a PowerPoint prentation using the diagram and wikipedia text to walk people through the different elements of UXD.  I think it would be sufficient for an overview of what UXD is.  Potentially I could design an exercise to demonstrate some of the methods better. 

    on April 20, 2015, 1:23 p.m.
  • Phyllis said:

    I did research on Distributive Justice through Google using the advanced search facility to ensure that the results are available for free distribution and use as it forms part of the next lecture we are covering in the online module on Sustainability and Greed for which I am a Teaching Assistant aty UNISA. I chose the subject as I could use the results to distribute to the students immediately and the subject matter would thus be relevant to both the subject I am involved with at UNISA abd the P2PU course as well.

    I was quite impressed as one of the articles mentioned that distributive justice was actually one of the arguments used to justify the requirements to make certain information available to the public for free.

    Some of the usefull sites were:

    http://www.csudh.edu/dearhabermas/nozick01bk.htm

    http://www.opticon1826.com/article/view/opt.121202/171

    http://www.philosophypages.com/hy/2t.htm

    http://taxhaven.wikispaces.com/Distributive+justice

    http://www.everydaycvitizen.com/2009/03/distributive_justice.html

     

    on Aug. 26, 2014, 1:32 p.m.

    religionedu said:

    Hi, it's believeable viewing your contribution in the on going free online education provisioned by the p2pu-community by cc licenses which stipulates about its free uses by copyright law, am Jesmion, a p2pu-religionedu's organizer, i introduced morality and its complexity, i appreciate your inputs as stated, --------
    on Aug. 26, 2014, 7:51 p.m. in reply to Phyllis
  • Laura said:

    Hi everyone!

    Some of the resources I have been found I found in OER Resources, and I didn't want to look at any place more, because there are many resources that I can use, so here some of them:

    • http://www.oercommons.org/courses/make-a-terrarium/view

    • http://www.oercommons.org/courses/energy-choices-and-climate-change/view

    • http://www.oercommons.org/courses/energy-efficient-housing/view (this page is very completed, and I have found so much resources)

    About the questions:

    • Were you able to find what you needed?

    Yes, I am  very excited with the results, there is a lot of material to know! Maybe, one of the things to consider is about the language, at least in this source (OER), the material was in English, and my native language is Spanish, so maybe for some of the students and teachers it can't be easy.

    • Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?

    Definetely, the page that I visited was perfect. And I was looking for other material about others topics and I found so much resources. The most of them was excellent.

    • How about any that were hard to use?

    No for the moment.

    • Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was?

    I had to reviewed the terms of use at the final of the each page, and the second and third resources are open. for thefirst resource I did not find the license, but suposed yes because the main page.

    • How might you use the stuff that you found?

    I want to share it with my partners, review it again and find others resources. First, we have to learn about the greenhouse very well for the second part: teh designing and building. Also with the material for kids, design some activities in wich they can to know and propose about the topic.

    • Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

    No, it is no sufficient. I think I must search more about the design of the greenhose, some examples, problems and solves for take in account. And more documents about researches.

     

    on March 24, 2014, 3:35 p.m.
  • Lena said:

    I had a difficult time finding open resources about the economy of Washington, D.C. Most of the text sources I found were news sources that had all rights reserved. i was able to find many photographs with open access, which would be useful for preparing a presentation for a lecture. 

    on Oct. 24, 2013, 3:51 p.m.
  • Nicole Southgate said:

    I'd like to create a medical/healthcare image library for our medical students so that they can be exposed to the culture of open media. Just by reading the other participants' discussions, I've come across more open sites which could help me do that. 

    I also implement searching for OER as a workshop for first year students every year, and I am always looking for new sites.

     

     

    on Sept. 6, 2013, 2:13 a.m.

    malicke said:

    Hi Nicole! That's awesome! If you haven't come across it already, you may find this collection of open med/health image collections and websites useful:  https://open.umich.edu/wiki/Open_Content_Search#Medical

    on Sept. 6, 2013, 8:43 a.m. in reply to Nicole Southgate
  • Sérgio Leal said:

    I'm used to conduct research of OER resources and don't had difficulty finding what I needed until now. 

    You can see here in my blog some research links.

    I am an educational researcher and I am putting in a Google Docs webpage the resources that allowed me find the articles, images, videos, and all the materials that I need to use as a teacher and during my PhD research. The finds I have done are enough for the needs I have so far.

    on Aug. 25, 2013, 5:58 p.m.
  • Clare Forrest said:

    To help students make book trailers of their own I made this website to help them:

    https://sites.google.com/a/raroa.school.nz/book-trailers/home

    Were you able to find what you needed? 

    I found some good free to use sites for images, videos and music. There are plenty of choices. It is not so easy to find images of commercial type books like Harry Potter or The Hunger Games as these are heavily Copyrighted.

    Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?

    I really liked http://www.flickr.com/search/advanced/ as it is really clear what cc licence is being used and who you have to accredit the image to.

    How about any that were hard to use?

    It is harder to find decent music to use that is appropriate for the book trailer.

    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 

    Only using "Free to Use" sites made this alot easier.

    How might you use the stuff that you found? Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

    This has been useful for me to update the Book Trailer website I made so students have a place to find resources.

    on Aug. 25, 2013, 2:11 a.m.

    Jane Park said:

    Hi Clare -- have you tried http://creativecommons.org/music-communities for music?

    on Aug. 28, 2013, 6:28 p.m. in reply to Clare Forrest
  • Maria Teresa said:

    My goal was to create a collection of useful resources for the work I do (teacher, coordinator of ICT in my school, eTwinning ambassador). I chose as a tool to achieve this repository of materials Pearltress, a free tool.

    http://maestramariateresa.blogspot.it/2013/08/oer-open-educational-resources-vs.html

    Pearltrees is a social library, where you can collect, organize and share what interests you is using that URL through the upload. Pearltrees users can freely share their pearls. It is thus to create a large community of free trade. Every link collected in every account is fully public. 

    The terms of use are specified in the page Pearltrees TERMS OF USE http://www.pearltrees.com/info/terms
    Section 3: Our intellectual property rights
    and Section 4. Your intellectual property rights.
    regard to the resources collected by me, in addition to entering those already indicated by Creative Commons in this course, I used the Google search engine and carried out an audit and a selection of the various sites found in internet. The research was quite challenging but not difficult
     
    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 
    The selection of resources to be found me took careful observation of the presence of Creative Commons licenses and the terms of use specified on many portals
     
    Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen?
    It is a fairly rich and varied collection of resources that can be integrated at any time and enriched. It is a great starting point
    on Aug. 23, 2013, 2:08 p.m.
  • Aimee said:

     

    My topic is Creative Commons. 

    Here is a link to my blog where I posted links to the resources I found.

    http://agale.global2.vic.edu.au/2013/03/31/teach-someone-something-with-open-content/

    I found a few resources but I think I will keep looking for some more. I found You Tube harder to use than others as most often the licensing was just "Standard You Tube License". I need to do some more research into what this means. 

    When the Creative Commons license was listed on the site it made it very easy to know what I can and can't do with the content. I have realised how easy it is to use Creative Commons licensed work.

    I hope to use what I have found to inform me when I teach my year 3/4 class and also when I run staff meeting sessions with the staff at my school. 

    on March 31, 2013, 8:39 a.m.
  • Joanne Hammond said:

    I love the digital slider at http://librarycopyright.net/resources/digitalslider/.  It clearly shows that one has to dig deeper than just using a cutoff date to determine whether something is in the public domain.

    I also found a great OER "Copyright for Librarians" course: http://www.oercommons.org/courses/about-copyright-for-librarians/view and the accompanying citation for it:

    Center, Berkman. Copyright for Librarians. Connexions. 15 June 2011 http://cnx.org/content/col11329/1.2/.

    on March 21, 2013, 9:35 p.m.
  • Cathryn said:

    I am always looking for high quality open content that I can share with faculty and students. I learned about CC several years ago.  And while attending a virtual conference, I learned about Gooru.  As well, I have been searching for open resources for a few years.  I use open resources in the two courses that I teach - Introduction to Designing Online Courses and Technology in Administration. I also share content-specific resources with the high school faculty I work with.

    on March 18, 2013, 5:06 p.m.

    malicke said:

    Introduction to Designing Online Courses and Technology in Administration both sound like very interesting and in-demand courses/topics. It's very likely that some of the folks participating in this p2pu course are also interested in viewing slides and materials from these kinds of courses.

    Are your course materials cc licensed? Why/Why not?  

    Are you sharing your materials from these courses anywhere? If so, can you post links? 

    on March 19, 2013, 9:36 a.m. in reply to Cathryn
  • Cat said:

    My subject being just pictures from places in France I found many through the advanced search in Google with the 'labeled for resuse with modification' tool. I tried Morguefile.com too with some success.

     

    on March 17, 2013, 8:56 p.m.

    malicke said:

    Excellent. Can you share some of the images you found? 

    Also, now that you've created an open educational resource, can you share your plans for using it and sharing it?

    on March 18, 2013, 11:31 a.m. in reply to Cat
  • Anonym said:

    Were you able to find what you needed?

    I was able to find what I was looking for; however, I was slightly disappointed by the amount and quality of information I was able to find and use openly.

    Were there good repositories or sources of content that were particularly valuable?

    The best link I found was a government based site that offered answers to the majority of my questions.

    Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 

    I had a difficult time deciphering certain sites. Most sites provided me with either a copyright symbol or a terms and conditions contract; however, I did run into a few sites that contained nothing at all. I was not sure if this meant it was open or not. I took it to mean that it was not yet copyrighted material, and thus used it as a resource.

    How might you use the stuff that you found?

    I may use the information I found to become informed in this topic area, as well as to inform others in my professional area. The information I found will be a great asset to my special education classroom.

    Is it sufficient for teaching someone about the topic you've chosen? What's missing and how might you fill the gaps?

    I believe the information I have gathered is sufficient in providing myself and peers with a general over view of behavior intervention. However, I would like to generate more resources so as to get a more in-depth look at the nitty gritty behind behavior intervention plans, strategies, etc…

    As a student I may be able to fill in these educational gaps by conferring with my instructors and peers, as well as other professionals. However, I may also be able to use the internet to find open educational resources to compliment and fill in additional gaps. Other open sources may include images of behavior intervention plans, as well as open educational videos displaying how to fill out BIP forms, the dos and don’ts of behavior intervention strategies etc…

    on Feb. 1, 2013, 3:32 p.m.

    malicke said:

     

    "Was it easy to tell whether or not things were open, and what the license was? 

    I had a difficult time deciphering certain sites. Most sites provided me with either a copyright symbol or a terms and conditions contract; however, I did run into a few sites that contained nothing at all. I was not sure if this meant it was open or not. I took it to mean that it was not yet copyrighted material, and thus used it as a resource."

    Generally speaking, this means that the content is not open.

    "Copyright status is automatic upon creation of your original creative work in a fixed, tangible form. Registration with the U.S. Copyright Office is not necessary for copyright status and protection, though registration is needed in order to pursue an infringement claim in court." http://www.teachingcopyright.org/handout/copyright-faq

    edit: font size

    on Feb. 4, 2013, 3:52 p.m. in reply to Anonym
  • glsteber said:

    There are tons of resources about winter cycle commuting: current articles, blogs, videos, all readily available on the Internet.

    on Jan. 23, 2013, 6:29 p.m.
  • Anonym said:

     

    Besides the given repositories, I used morguefile.com a picture repository which content is licensed under creative commons in its different flavors.

    When you search in sites like this is too easy to know if this is open content but when you're in google and find some interesting picture that you can use in your project or website it's very hard to know, you have to refer to the website of the owner and see what kind of license is.

    In my personal project create a website using open and free software tools was to easy to find tools, documentation and resources to do it, if I have to teach to someone how to do a simple blog it would be easy because the documentation (the official documentation the most important) is CC or GPL and that tools have no use restrictions

    on Nov. 19, 2012, 12:54 a.m.

    malicke said:

    Hi Diddier! 

    Thanks for pointing to morguefile.com. It looks like morguefile uses their own license:

    http://morguefile.com/license/morguefile

    Is there anyone out there willing to compare/contrast this license to Creative Commons licenses?

    on Nov. 19, 2012, 9:59 a.m. in reply to Anonym
  • Bilal Baydoun said:

    It was relatively easy finding a general answer to my question. A more detailed understanding of the subject was more difficult to achieve. Usually, when I am looking to answer a question like this one, I go to lib.umich.edu and use the "articles plus" feature. I then check the boxes that say "limit to peer reviewed journals" and "exclude newspaper articles." This method allows me to see what the credible academics have to say. 

    But since I couldn't do that for this challenge (it's not an openly licensed repository), I had to settle for the more vague and subjective Wikipedia page. The map on the Shebaa Farms wiki page was helpful and openly licensed. 

    on June 13, 2012, 4:20 p.m.